UX to Lead, UX to Follow

February 16, 2017

We believe user experience defines, not just designs, great products.


We’re not alone. There are many sources that claim user experience (UX) perpetuates iterations. Humans inform technological transformations with our everyday behaviors, while our lives become increasingly entwined with digital interactions, even at the most basic of instances (such as turning on a light switch). These sources tell us how to effectively, efficiently, and profoundly deliver solutions. Solutions that intuit the user’s needs, with a beautiful interface, and a futuristic delivery aesthetic, all enabling the dream of instant adoption. It can seem like a lot.

When everyone is pressing UX design features and necessities, it’s hard to know what’s important, but one can sift through the noise.

Occam’s razor likes to remind us to keep it simple. Maybe don’t create in a vacuum. Disruption as a default is a dangerous notion. Give the people what they want, but first find out what they want. And in a world where our interactions become increasingly digital and data driven, maybe the UX is discoverable and more available, and maybe all we need to do is ask.


Skyline

Seattle, Washington

Seattle sits pretty as the third-best market for technology according to CBRE’s 2016 Scoring Tech Talent . With large players in the landscape (Microsoft and Amazon to name two) our region positions itself to make a big splash in emerging technology such as VR/AR, IoT, & OTT. While it’s exciting to impact the evolution of these technologies, we also need to remember all of the important factors for turning out great products in an environment where words like “disruption” and “innovation” start to sound overplayed.

As we creatively solve complex and integrated problems for multiple industries, we turn to the user to advise us in what technology is useful, necessary, accessible, and inspiring. Users also guide us in how new technologies and features are best deployed.

We’ve been thinking about the relevance of UX design, and these are a few of the current ideas around UX we’ve distilled:

UX Now: Take the Pulse

Methods for incorporating UX design in product solutions work best when the user is consulted upfront, assumptions are not made about what the user desires, and the results of the user’s reports are verified and validated. You can read more about putting users first at tech.co. Other key factors to promote better integrated UX design require the solutions to be informed by cutting edge evolutions in technology and pulse keeping on trends and industry expectations. Uxdesign.cc has a great article on The State of UX in 2017 and Sidebar curates links to design articles daily.

UX Next: Educate Yourself

If you’re starting out in the world of UX design, these are just a few of the educational opportunities that present themselves in the Pacific Northwest region: Bellevue College’s User Experience Design Certificate or General Assembly’s User Experience Design Fundamentals. University of Washington also offers an excellent program in The School of Human Design and Engineering.

UX Networking: Connect the Dots

Collaboration is key in unveiling unique UX that delights and defines technologies and it starts with an engaging community. You can connect with other UX professionals at ConveyUX in Seattle later this month and get updated on the current industry trends and tools.

Step Up to the Plate

Do you have what it takes? L4 Digital is seeking a Senior UX/UI Designer with an intuitive vision that translates to a strong customer experience for rapidly evolving, multi-platform digital products, systems, and services.

Click to apply

In the age of rapid technological evolution things are always changing; in UX design we are able to react to these changes to ensure seamless use but also influence the direction of our transformations. We think that’s an exciting place to be.

Talia Lliteras

As Marketing Manager, Talia serves as Editor of the L4 Digital Blog and generates content across media channels. She is a marketing and communications professional, with a background in digital and new media, and has a deep interest in proactive and mindful human and technology interfacing. In her free time she enjoys yoga, writing, film, finding the best new places to wine and dine, and practicing speaking French.

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